sangiovese

Chianti





Chianti, is an Italian wine produced in the Chianti region in central Tuscany.

 

Chianti wines are historically associated with a shorter bottle with a round base enclosed in a straw basket called a fiasco, however the fiasco has slowly gone away and is now used only by a few wine makers in the region.

 

Chianti is a small region within Tuscany, but a wine calling itself “Chianti” is allowed to be made almost anywhere in Tuscany

 

Baron Bettino Ricasoli* who later became the Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Italy, created the Chianti recipe in the middle of the 19th century.

 

The recipe consisted of:

70% Sangiovese,

15% Canaiolo,

15% Malvasia Bianca 

 

Since 1996 the blend for Chianti and Chianti Classico has been

75–100% Sangiovese,

up to 10% Canaiolo,

up to 20% of any other approved red grape variety such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot or Syrah.

 

Since 2006, the use of white grape varieties such as Malvasia and Trebbiano have been prohibited in Chianti Classico.
Chianti Classico must have a minimum alcohol level of at least 12% with a minimum of 7 months aging in oak, while Chianti Classico’s labeled Riserva must be aged at least 24 months at the winery, with a minimum alcohol level of at least 12.5%. For basic Chianti, the minimum alcohol level is 11.5%.
 

Chianti is Sangiovese

Sangiovese is Italy's most commonly-planted red grape variety and is particularly common in central Italy. In 1990, almost 10% of all Italian vineyards were planted with some form of this grape.

 

The Sangiovese grape is a thin-skinned grape, so it makes very translucent wines. Sangiovese is slow and late to ripen, which gives a rich, alcoholic and long-lived wine  (which means it will age well). In your glass it displays a ruby red color with flashes of bright burnt orange.

 
 

Pairing Chianti with Food

Chianti has high acidity and coarse tannins which makes it an incredible wine with almost any food dish. Chianti is one of those wines that goes well with whatever you feel like eating. It’s as much a pizza and pasta wine as a grilled cheese and fries wine. Ideal with dishes that use olive oil or highlight rich pieces of meat such as Steak, and Roasted Pork.

 

From simple $10 to $15 Chianti to the more substantial Chianti Classico (generally between $15 and $25), Chianti remains one of the wine world’s great values. Chianti Classico Riservas are a bit more costly, ranging from $28 to $45 per bottle.
 
* Baron Bettino Ricasoli (1809 – 1880) politician, researcher and wine entrepreneur, was the promoter of the most famous wine in the world today: Chianti.
 
Read more about the Baron...
 

History of wine in America

 


A short history of wine in America.

 
American vineyards are hundreds of years old, but the U.S. is still considered a newcomer in wine production. The number of North American wineries surpassed 9,000 in 2016, and this growth is expected to continue. With new varietals coming from California, Washington, Oregon, New York, Texas and more, there’s no doubt that American vines are important and are here to stay.

 

Ponce de Leon arrived in Florida in 1513, and was followed by Spanish and French Huguenot settlers who began making wine as early as 1565 with the native American grape, Muscadine.
 
New Mexico established the first vineyards in 1629, when Spanish missionaries planted cuttings of the "Mission grape." Wine came to California in 1769 when the Spanish built the San Diego mission, and then continued to move north with the establishment of 20 other missions, until concluding with the Sonoma mission in 1823.  

California has the most wineries in the U.S. by far. Accounting for about 87 percent of the total U.S. wine production.

 
President Thomas Jefferson attempted to establish a winery and plant vineyards in Virginia in the late 1700s and early 1800s. However, he was not successful due to black rot and the pest phylloxera. Because of this, many of the East Coast and Midwest American wineries still use native American or hybrid grapes, such as the Concord, Niagara, Norton, and Catawba: they are more tolerant of those climates. Brotherhood Winery in New York, for example, established in 1839 and the oldest continually operated winery in America, continues to use some native American grapes, especially Riesling.
 
The geographical range of those early American wineries is wide. The Wollersheim Winery in Wisconsin was originally established in 1842 by Count Harazathy from Hungary, before he headed west to start California's oldest premium winery Buena Vista in 1857.
 
Other notable early wineries:;
 
Stone Hill Winery in Missouri dates from 1847,  
Meiers Winery in Ohio from 1856,  
Renault Winery of New Jersey 1864.  
 
Further south,
Wiederkehr Wine Cellars and Post Famile Vineyards of Arkansas both started in 1880,  
Val Verde Winery of Texas began in 1883. 
 
The oldest continually operated sparkling winery in California is Korbel Champagne Cellars founded in 1882.

 

More wine and US Presidents...

 

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